The Society for French Historical Studies


 

ACTIVITIES

French Historical Studies (SFHS Journal, site at Arizona State University)

Conferences

Past Conference Programs

Academic Prizes and Awards

Past Winners

GOVERNANCE

Executive Committee

Bylaws

CONTACT SFHS

JOIN SFHS

 

 

Copyright © 2008 by the Society for French Historical Studies, all rights reserved. The Society for French Historical Studies permits the electronic distribution for nonprofit educational purposes, provided that full and accurate credit is given to the author, the date of publication, and its location on the H-France website. No republication or distribution by print media will be permitted without permission. For any other proposed uses, contact the Editor-in-Chief of H-France.

Maintained by the H-France Web Editorial Team

AWARDS AND PRIZES


Pinkney Prize | Chinard Prize | Koren Prize
Research Travel Award | Wolf Travel Fellowship | Marjorie M. and Lancelot L. Farrar Memorial Award| Natalie Zemon Davis Graduate Student Paper Award


THE DAVID PINKNEY PRIZE

The David Pinkney Prize is awarded annually by the Society for French Historical Studies for the best book on French history published by a North American scholar.

2013
William Reddy, Duke University, for
The Making of Romantic Love: Longing and Sexuality in Europe, South Asia and Japan 900-
1200 (University of Chicago Press, 2012)

2012
Prof. Daniel Sherman, Department of Art and Art History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, for French Primitivism and the Ends of Empire, 1945-1975 (University of Chicago Press, 2011)

2011
Jeremy Popkin, Professor of History, University of Kentucky, for
You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery
(Cambridge University Press, 2010)

2009

Benjamin Claude Brower, Assistant Professor of History, University of Texas, Austin, for A DESERT NAMED PEACE: THE VIOLENCE OF FRANCE'S EMPIRE IN THE ALGERIAN SAHARA, 1844-1902 (Columbia University Press, 2009).

2008

Jennifer Popiel, Assistant Professor of HIstory, St. Louis University, for Rousseau's Daughters: Domesticity, Education, and Autonomy in Modern France University of New Hampshire Press, 2008.

2007

Prof. Carol Symes, Dept. of History, University of Illinois, for A Common Stage: Theater and Public Life in Medieval Arras (Cornell: Cornell University Press, 2007).

2006

Hans J. Hummer, Wayne State University for Politics and Power in Early Medieval Europe: Alsace and the Frankish Realm, 600-1000 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), and Gregory Mann, Columbia University, for Native Sons: West African Veterans and France in the Twentieth Century (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2006).

2005

Jan Goldstein, Dept of History, University of Chicago, for The Post-Revolutionary Self: Politics and the Psyche in France, 1750-1850 (Harvard University Press).

2004

Laurent Dubois, Michigan State University, for A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804. University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

2003

Ronald Schechter, College of William and Mary, for Obstinate Hebrews: Representations of Jews in France, 1715-1815. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003.

Honorable Mention:
Michael Bess, Vanderbilt University, for The Light-Green Society. Ecology and Technological Modernity in France, 1960-2000. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

2002

Paul Friedland, Bowdoin College, Political Actors: Representative Bodies and Theatricality in the Age of the French Revolution (Cornell University Press, 2002)

2001

Frederic L. Cheyette, Emengard of Narbonne and the World of the Troubadours (Cornell University Press, 2001)

2000

Michael Kwass, Privilege and the Politics of Taxation in Eighteenth-Century France (Cambridge University Press, 2000)

1999

Ruth Harris, Lourdes: Body and Spirit in a Secular Age (New York: Viking, 1999).

1998

John Markoff and Gilbert Shapiro, Revolutionary Demands: A Content Analysis of the Cahiers de doléances of 1789 (Stanford University Press, 1998)

1997

Thomas Brennan, Burgundy to Champagne: The Wine Trade in Early Modern France (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1997).

1996

John Markoff, The Abolition of Feudalism: Peasants, Lords, and Legislators in the French Revolution (Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996)

1995

Laura Lee Downs, Manufacturing Inequality: gender division in the French and British metalworking industries, 1914-1939 (Cornell University Press, 1995)

1994

David Bell (Yale University), Lawyers and Citizens: The Making of a Political Elite in Old Regime France (Oxford University Press, 1994)

1993

Sarah Maza (Northwestern University), Private Lives and Public Affairs: The Causes Celebres of Prerevolutionary France (University of California Press, 1993)

Lester Little (Smith College), Benedictine Maledictions: Liturgical Cursing in Romanesque France (Cornell University Press)

1991 and 1992

Raymond Grew and Patrick Harrigan, Schools, State, and Society (University of Michigan Press, 1991)

1989 and 1990

Jo Burr Margandant, Madame Le Professeur: Women Educators in the Third Republic (Princeton University Press, 1990)

Elizabeth Rapley, The Devotées: Women and Church in Seventeenth Century France (Queen's University Press, 1990)

Honorable Mention:
Carole Fink, Marc Bloch: A Life in History (Cambridge University Press, 1989)

1987 and 1988

Robert M. Schwartz, Policing the Poor in Eighteenth-Century France (University of North Carolina Press, 1988)

Honorable Mention:
Michael Marrinan, Painting Politics for Louis-Philippe (Yale University Press, 1988)

THE GILBERT CHINARD PRIZE

The Gilbert Chinard Prize is an annual award made jointly by the Society for French Historical Studies and the Institut Français de Washington for the best book on the history of themes shared by France and the Americas.

2013
Rebecca Scott and Jean Hébrard, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, for
Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation (Harvard University Press,
2012)

2012
 
Prof. Brooke Blower, Department of History, Boston University, for Becoming Americans in Paris: Transatlantic Politics and Culture between the World Wars (Oxford University Press, 2011)

2011
Ashli White, Assistant Professor of History, University of Miami, for
Encountering  Revolution: Haiti and the Making of the Early Republic
(Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010)

2010

Rachel Hope Cleves, Assistant Professor of History, University of Victoria, for THE REIGN OF TERROR IN AMERICA: VISIONS OF VIOLENCE FROM ANTI-JACOBINISM TO ANTISLAVERY (Cambridge University Press, 2009).

2009

Neil Safier, Assistant Professor of History, University of British Columbia, for Measuring the New World: Enlightenment Science and South America University of Chicago Press, 2008

2008

Prof. Vanessa Schwartz, It’s So French!: Hollywood, Paris, and the Making of Cosmopolitan Film Culture (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007).

2007

John Garrigus, University of Texas-Arlington, for Before Haiti Race and Citizenship in French Saint-Domingue (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006).

2006

Stacy Schiff, for A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Brith of America (Henry Holt and Co.).

2005

Allan Greer, University of Toronto, for Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005).

2004

Brent Hayes Edwards, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, for The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2003).

2003

Mark Hulliung, Brandeis University, Citizens and Citoyens: Republicans and Liberals in America and France (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2002).

2002

Irwin M. Wall, University of California, Riverside, France, the United States, and the Algerian War (Univ. of California Press, 2001)

2001

Jacques Portes, Université de Paris VIII, Fascination and Misgivings: The United States in French Opinion, 1870-1914. Translated by Elborg Forster (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000).

2000

Samuel Scott, History Department, Wayne State University, From Yorktown to Valmy (University of Colorado Press, 1999) .

1999

Philip Katz, N.Y. Council for the Humanities, From Appomattox to Montmartre: Americans and the Paris Commune (Harvard University Press, 1998).

1998

Nancy Green, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Ready to Wear, Ready to Work: A Century of Industrialization and Immigration in New York and Paris

1997

Lloyd Kramer, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Lafayette in Two Worlds: Public Culture and Personal Identities in an Age of Revolutions (UNC Press, 1996).

1996

Laura Meixner, Cornell University, French Realist Painting and the Critique of American Society, 1856-1900 (Cambridge University Press, 1995).

1995

Elisa C. Klaus, Every Child a Lion: The Origins of maternal and Infant Health Policy in the United States and France, 1890-1920 (Cornell University Press, 1993).

1994

No prize awarded

1993

Richard Kuisel, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Seducing the French: The Dilemma of Americanization (Universtiy of California Press, 1993).

1992

No prize awarded

1991

Irwin M. Wall, University of California-Riverside, The United States and the Making of Postwar France, 1945-1954 (Cambridge University Press, 1991).

1990

No prize awarded

1989

Patrice Higonnet, Harvard University, Sister Republics: The Origins of French and American Republicanism (Harvard University Press, 1988).

1988

No prize awarded

1987

Robert S. Weddle, Editor, La Salle, the Mississippi, and the Gulf: Three Primary Documents (Texas A&M University Press, 1987).

1986

Carl J. Ekberg, Illinois State University, Colonial Ste. Genevieve: An Adventure on the Mississippi Frontier (Patrice Press, 1985).

1985

James Axtell, College of William and Mary, The Invasion Within: The Contect of Cultures in Colonial North America (Oxford University Press, 1985).

1984

Patricia Kay Galloway, Mississippi Department Archives, Editor for volumes IV and V of Mississippi Provincial Archives: French Dominion, 1729-1748, 1749-1763 (LSU Press, 1984).

1983

Jon Butler, Yale, The Huguenots in America: A Refugee People in New World Society (Harvard University Press, 1983)

1982

Orville T. Murphy, State University of New York at Buffalo, Charles Fravier, Comte de Vergennes: French Diplomacy in the Age of Revolution, 1719-1787 (State University of New York Press, 1982).

1981

John G. Reid, Acadia, Maine, and New Scotland: Marginal Colonies in the Seventeenth Century (University of Toronto Press, 1981).

1980

James H. Hutson, John Adams and the Diplomacy of the American Revolution, (University of Kentucky Press)

G.C. Incentive Prize: Robert R. Crout, "The Diplomacy of Trade: The Influence of Commercial Considerations on French Involvement in the Anglo-American War of Independence, 1775-1778" (dissertation).

1979

Stanley J. Idzerda, Editor-in-chief of the Lafayette Papers, Cornell University Library, Lafayette in the Age of the American Revolution: Selected Letters and Papers, 1776-1790 (Cornell University Press, 1983).

G.C. Incentive Prize: Edward Angel, "James Monroe's Mission to Paris, 1794-1796" (dissertation).

1978

Jay Higginbotham, Local History Section of the Mobile Public Library, Old Mobile: Fort Louis de la Louisiane, 1702-1711 (Museum of the City of Mobile, 1977).

G.C. Incentive Prize: Thomas A. Sancton, Oxford University, "Red, White, and Blue: A Study of the American Image in the Eyes of the French Left, 1848-1871."

1977

Lee Kennett, University of Georgia, The French Forces in America 1780-1783 (Greenwood Press, 1977).

1976

No prize awarded

Honorable Mention: Howard C. Rice, Thomas Jefferson's Paris (Princeton University Press, 1976).

1975

Jonathan A. Dull, University of Texas, The French Navy and American Independence: A Study of Arms and Diplomacy, 1774-1787 (Princeton University Press, 1976).

Stephen A. Schuker, Cambridge, Massachusettes, The End of French Dominance in Europe (UNC Press)

Honorable Mention: Henry Blumenthal, Rutgers University, American and French Culture, 1800 to 1900: Interchanges of Arts, Science, Literature, and Society (LSU Press, 1976).
Russell M. Jones, Westminster College, "The Parisian Education of an American Surgeon, 832-1835."

1974

Albert Hall Bowman, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, The Struggle for Neutrality: Franco-American Diplomacy in the Federalist Era (University of Tennessee Press, 1974).

G.C. Incentive Prize: Melvin B. Leffler, Vanderbilt University, "The Struggle for Stability: America Policy toward France, 1921-1933."

1973

William J. Eccles, University of Toronto, France in America (Harper & Row, 1972).

Jacob Price, University of Michigan, France and the Chesapeake: A History of the French Tobacco Monopoly, 1574-1791, and Its Relationship to the British and American Tobacco Trades (University of Michigan Press, 1973, 2 vols).

G.C. Incentive Prize: James T. Schlefer, College of New Rochelle, "The Making of Tocqueville's American (manuscript).

1972

Howard C. Rice, Jr., and Anne S. K. Brown, The American Campaigns of Rochambeau's Army, 1780-1783 (Princetown University Press and Brown University Press).

1971

Nancy Nichols Barker, The French Legation in Texas (Texas State Historical Association, 2 vols).

1970

Laura V. Monti, chair of special collections section of University of Florida library, to support the publication of a detailed inventory of the Rochambeau Papers.

1969

No prize awarded

1968

Daniel Carroll, Villanova University, "Henri Mercier's Diplomatic Mission to Washington" (manuscript, subsequently published as Henri Mercier and the American Civil War).

1967

William C. Stinchcombe, Syracuse University, "French-American Alliance in American Politics, 1778-1783" (manuscript, subsequently published as The American Revolution and the French Alliance).

THE WILLIAM KOREN, JR. PRIZE

This prize of $1,000 is awarded to the outstanding journal article published on any era of French history by a North American scholar in an American, European, or Canadian journal during 2008. The committee will seek out the entries and announce the recipient of the award at the annual meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies.

2013
John Warne Monroe, Iowa State University, for
“Surface Tensions: Empire, Parisian Modernism, and ‘Authenticity’ in African Sculpture,
1917-1939,” American Historical Review 117.2 (2012): 445-75

Honorable Mention to Victoria Thompson, Arizona State University, for
“The Creation, Destruction and Recreation of Henry IV, “ History and Memory 24.2 (2012): 5-40.

2012

Prof. Thomas Dodman, Department of History, George Mason University, for “Un pays pour la colonie: Mourir de nostalgie en Algérie française, 1830-1880,” Annales: Histoire, Sciences Sociales no. 3 (Sept. 2011): 743-84.

Honorable mention to:  Dr. Jamie Kreiner, Fellow, Stanford University Humanities Center for “About the Bishop: The Episcopal Entourage and the Economy of Government in Late Medieval Gaul,” Speculum 86 (2011): 321-60.

2011

Rafe Blaufarb, Professor of History, Florida State University, for
“Conflict and Compromise: Communauté et Seigneurie in Early Modern Provence,” Journal of Modern History 82 (September 2010): 519-45
       
Honorable Mention to:
Mary Louise Roberts, Professor of History, University of Wisconsin, Madison, for
“The Silver Foxhole: The GIs and Prostitution in Paris,” French Historical Studies 33.1 (Winter 2010): 99-128

2010

Michel de Waele, Professor of History, Universite Laval, Quebec, for "'Paris est libre,' Entries as Reconciliations: From Charles VII to Charles de Gaulle," FRENCH HISTORY 23.4 (December 2009): 425-45.

Honorable Mention: Christopher Hodson, Assistant Professor of History, Brigham Young University, for "Colonizing the Patrie: An Experiment Gone Wrong in Old Regime France," FRENCH HISTORICAL STUDIES 32.2 (Spring 2009): 193-222.

2009

Caroline Ford, Professor of History, University of California, Los Angeles, for "Reforestation, Landscape Conservation, and the Anxieties of Empire in French Colonial Algeria," American Historical Review 113.2 (April 2008): 341-62

Honorable Mention Dan Edelstein, Dept. of French, Stanford University, for "War and Terror" The Law of Nations from Grotius to the French Revolution," French Historical Studies 31.2 (Spring 2008): 229-62

2008

Prof. Lenard Berlanstein, Dept. of History, University of Virginia, for “Selling Modern Feminity: Femina, a Forgotten Feminist Publishing Success in Belle Epoque France,” French Historical Studies 30 (2007), 623-49.

Allan Tulchin, "Same-sex Couples Creating Households in Old Regime France: The Use of the Affrèrement," Journal of Modern History 79.3 (September 2007): 613-47

2007

Natalie Lozovsky, Independent Scholar, Berkeley, California for “Roman Geography and Ethnography in the Carolingian Empire,” Speculum 81 (2006), 325-364.

2006

Paul A. Rahe, University of Tulsa, for "The Book that Never Was: Montesquieu's 'Considerations on the Romans' in Historical Context," The History of Political Thought 26, no. 1 (Spring 2005): pp. 43-89.

2005

Jay Rubenstein, University of New Mexico, for "Putting History to Use: Three Crusade Chronicles in Context," Viator 35 (2004): pp. 131-168.

Honorable Mention goes to Neil Safier, Society of Fellows, University of Michigan, for "'To Collect and Abridge& Without Changing Anything Essential:' Rewriting Incan History at the Parisian Jardin du Roi," Book History 7 (2004): 63-96.

2004

Richard I. Jobs, (Pacific University, Forest Grove, for "Tarzan under Attack: Youth, Comics, and Cultural Reconstruction in Postwar France," French Historical Studies 26:4 (Fall 2003): 687-725.

Honorable Mention: Jolle Rollo-Koster, University of Rhode Island, for "The Politics of Body Parts: Contested Topographies in Late-Medieval Avignon," Speculum. A Journal of Medieval Studies 78:1 (2003): 66-98.

2003

Patricia Lorcin, Texas Tech University, "Rome and France in Africa: Recovering Colonial Algeria's Latin Past," French Historical Studies 25 (Spring 2002): 295-330.

Honorable Mention: Dena Goodman, University of Michigan, "L'ortografe des dames: Gender and Language in the Old Regime," French Historical Studies 25 (Spring 2002): 191-224.

2002

Jotham Parsons, "Money and Sovereignty in Early Modern France." Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (no. 1, January 2001): 59-79.

2001

Stéphane Gerson, "Town, Nation, or Humanity? Festival Delineation of Place and Past in Northern France, ca. 1825-65," Journal of Modern History 72 (September 2000): 628-82.

Distinguished designation to Brigitte Bedos-Rezak, "Medieval Identity: A Sign and a Concept," American Historical Review, 105 (5).

2000

Suzanne Desan, "Reconstituting the Social after the Terror: Family, Property, and Law in Popular Politics," Past and Present no. 164 (August 1999): 81-121.

Distingished designation to Jo Burr Margadant, "Gender, Vice and the Political Imaginary in Nineteenth-Century France: Reinterpreting the Failure of the July Monarchy, 1830-1848", American Historical Review, 1999.

1999

Alice Conklin, "Colonialism and Human Rights: The French Case in West Africa," American Historical Review 103:2 (1998).

Distinguished designation to Michael Kwass, "A Kingdom of Taxpayers: State Formation, Privilege, and Political Culture in Eighteenth-Century France," The Journal of Modern History 70 (June 1998): 295-339.

1998

Daniel Lord Smail, "Telling Tales in Angevin Courts," French Historical Studies 20 (Spring 1997): 183-215.

1997

Bonnie Smith, "History and Genius: The Narcotic, Erotic, and Baroque Life of Germaine de Stael," French Historical Studies 19 (Fall, 1996): 1059-1081.

1996

Elizabeth Rapley, "The Shaping of Things to Come: The Commission des Secours, 1727-1788," French History 8:4 (1994):420-442.

1995

Harry Liebersohn, "Discovering Indigenous Nobility: Tocqueville, Chamisso, and Romantic Travel Writing," American Historical Review 99 (1994):746-766.

1994

Liana Vardi, "Constructing the Harvest: Gleaners, Farmers, and Officials in Early Modern France," American Historical Review (1993).

1993

Judith Miller, "Politics and Urban Provisioning Crises: Bakers, Police, and Parlements in France, 1750-1793," Journal of Modern History 64:2 (1992).

1992

C. Stephen Jaeger, "L'Amour des rois: structure sociale d'une forme de sensibilité aristocratique," Annales: Économies, Sociétés, Civilisations 46 (1991).

Honorable Mention: Gay Gullickson, "Le Pétroleuse: Representing Revolution," Feminist Studies 17 (1991).

1991

Carla Hesse, "Enlightenment Epistemology and the Laws of Authorship in Revolutionary France, 1777-1793," Representations 30 (1990).

1990

Sarah Hanley, "Engendering the State: Family Formation and State Building in Early Modern France," French Historical Studies 16:1 (1989).

1989

Ruth Harris, "Melodrama, Hysteria, and Feminine Crimes of Passion in the Fin de Siecle," History Workshop 25 (1988): 31-63.

Honorable Mention: William Sewell, "Uneven Development, the Autonomy of Politics, and the Dockworkers of Nineteenth-Century Marseille," American Historical Review 93 (1988): 604-637.

1988

J. Russell Major "`Bastard Feudalism' and the Kiss: Changing Social Mores in Late Medieval and Early Modern France," Journal of Interdisciplinary History 17:3 (1987).

Gabrielle M. Spiegel, "Social Change and Literary Language: The Textualization of the Past in 13th-century Old French Historiography," Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies 17 (1987, no. 2): 129-148.

1987

Nancy Fitch, "Les petits parisiens en province: the Silent Revolution in the Allier, 1860-1900," Journal of Family History 11 (1986).

RESEARCH TRAVEL AWARD

The Society for French Historical Studies and the Western Society for French History offer an annual award of $2,000 for research conducted outside North America on any aspect of the history of France. This award is granted to an outstanding American or Canadian scholar who has received the doctorate in history in the five-year period prior to the award (since January 2004 for the 2009 award.) The award must be spent no more than one year after the fellowship is awarded. In no more than two pages (single-spaced), the applicant should outline the nature and scope of the project and the archives and libraries to be consulted. The applicant must submit three copies of the proposal and a curriculum vitae. In addition, the applicant must send or have sent two confidential letters of recommendation supporting the proposal. The deadline is 1 February 2009. The winner will be announced at the annual meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies. Please send applications and direct inquiries to the chair of the committee.

2013
Elena Napolitano, University of Toronto, for research on
“Prospects of Statecraft: Diplomacy, Territoriality, and the Vision of French Nationhood in
Rome, 1660-1700”

2012

Dr. Alexia Yates, Prize Fellow in Economics, History, and Politics, Center for History and Economics, Harvard University, for the project “Selling Paris: Real Estate and Commercial Culture in the Fin-de-siècle Metropolis”

2011

Christina Firpo, Assistant Professor of History, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, for “’Abandoned Children’: The Crises of Racial Patriarchy and the Forcible Removal of Mixed-Race Children in Colonial Indochina, 1890-1956”

2010

Jennifer Palmer, Assistant Professor, University of Chicago, for project, "An Ocean between Them: Race, Gender and the Family in France and Its Colonies."

2009

Jonathyne Briggs, Assistant Professor, Indiana University Northwest, for "Anarchie en France: Hypermodernity and French Popular Music, 1958-1981"

2008

Claire Salinas, Visiting Assistant Professor at Colorado College, for
"Settling Society in France and Algeria: Emigration, Colonization, and Liberal Politics, 1830-1870".

2007

Junko Tankeda, Syracuse University, for “Between France and the Mediterranean: Absolutism and Commercial Humanism in Marseille, 1660-1720.”

2006

Rebecca Pulju, Kent State University, for "The Woman's Paradise: Gender and Consumer Culture in France, 1944-1965."

2005

Sara Beam, University of Victoria, for "The Body of the Criminal in Europe, 1500 - 1750."

2004

Richard Keyser, assistant professor of history at Western Kentucky University, for "From Gift to Contract: The Transformation of Medieval Property Dealings, Champagne 1100-1350."

2003

Richard C. Keller, assistant professor of medical history and history of science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, "Developing Madness: The Psychiatrist's Civilizing Mission in French North Africa, 1900-1962"

2002

Sean Kennedy (University of New Brunswick) for his project entitled "The Croix de Few and the Parti Social Français in Algeria."

2001

Nancy Locklin, Assistant Professor, Maryville College (TN). Ph.D, Emory University. Project: "Women in Early Modern Brittany: Rethinking Work and Identity in a Traditional Economy"

2000

Patrick R. Young, Fordham University, "The Consumer as National Subject: Bourgeois Tourism in the French Third Republic, 1880-1914"

1999

Michael Lynn, "Popular Science in the French Enlightenment: The Dissemination of Natural Philosophy and the Creation of an Urban Scientific Culture"

1998

Nancy Edwards, lecturer Bowdoin College, for her project, "Regendering the Nation: the Role of the Housewife in French Indentity Formation from 1918 to Vichy" (Dissertation at UC Berkeley)

1997

Mathew S. Kuefler, Rice University.

JOHN B. AND THETA H. WOLF TRAVEL FELLOWSHIP

The John B. and Theta H. Wolf Travel Fellowship is a memorial to John B. Wolf, distinguished historian and teacher and onetime president of the Society for French Historical Studies, and to his wife, Theta H. Wolf, professor of psychology and author of the well-received biography of Alfred Binet, a French pioneer in the development of IQ tests. Fully as significant as their scholarly achievements were the warm hospitality, advice, and encouragement John and Theta Wolf provided to countless graduate students over the course of five decades. Their generous bequest makes possible an award of $2,000 to be given annually to a doctoral student at a university in the United States or Canada for dissertation research in French history (any period) that reflects the Wolfs' interest in and contributions to the study of European history. The award is administered by the Society for French Historical Studies and the Western Society for French History. The winner will be announced at the annual meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies.

2013

Katherine Godwin, University of Illinois, for research on
“Strategic Litigation: Legal Culture and Daily Life in 16th-Century France”

2012

Terrence Peterson, Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, Madison, for the project “Pacifying the Muslim Body: The French Military and Social Engineering in the Algerian War”

2011

Lauren Mancia, doctoral candidate, Yale University, for “John of Fécamp, Spirituality in the Eleventh Century, and the Origins of a Devotion to a Human God”

2010

Nimisha Barton, Graduate student, Princeton University, for "Immigrant Communities of Paris: Gender and Acculturation in
France, 1914-1940."

2009

Carolyn Purnell, graduate student, University of Chicago, for "Refining the Body: Sensory Experimentation in the French Enlightenment"

Honorable mention to Jamie Wadowiec, graduate student, SUNY Binghamton, for "The Afterlives of Empire: Immigration and the Politics of Difference in Decolonized France, 1962-1974)

2008

Ethan Katz, PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin, for
"Jews and Muslims in the Shadow of Marianne: Conflicting Identities and Republican Culture in France, 1914-1985"

2007

Jeannette E. Miller, Ph.D. candidate, The Pennsylvania State University, for “The French State’s Policies toward the Harkis from the End of the Algerian War to the Present: Shifts, Stagnations, and Contradictions.”

2006

Edward Kolla, Ph.D. candidate, Yale University

2005

Cynthia Kreisel, Rutgers University, for "Breaking the Silence between War and Revolution: French Women's Sexuality and the Morés of Daily Life, 1953 - 1967."

2004

Camille Robcis, Ph.D. candidate at Cornell University, for "Rethinking the Family: Psychoanalysis, Anthropology, and the Problem of Kinship in France."

2003

Benjamin Kafka, Stanford University, "The Imaginary State: Paperwork and Political Thought in France, 1789-1860."

2002

Andrew Jainchill, UC Berkeley, "Republicanism and the Origins of French Liberalism, 1794-1817."

2001

Ronald Hass, Rice University, "Maoism in French Politics During the 1960s and 1970s."

2000

Nicole Herz, University of Virginia, University of Virginia "A Social and Cultural History of Photography in Lille, France (1839-1914)."

1999

Tracy Neal Leavalle, Arizona State University, "Religion, Encounter, and Community in French and Indian North America."

1998

Paul Schue, University of California, Irvine, "And all their Heros Spoke Spanish: Conceptions of Spanish Civil War Heroism in Contemporary France."

MARJORIE M. and LANCELOT L. FARRAR MEMORIAL AWARDS

The Farrar fellowships honor Marjorie M. Farrar and Lancelot L. Farrar.  Marjorie M. Farrar, esteemed historyian of modern France, was the author of books on the political career of Alexadre Millerand and on the strategy, politics, and diplomacy of the French blockade, 1914-1918.  Lancelot L. Farrar, esteemed historian of modern Europe, was the author of books on the foreign and domestic policies of Germany and other European nations during World War I.  The generous donations of the Farrars' family, friends, and colleagues make possible two awards of $2500 each for doctoral students in French history at North American universities to support work on outstanding dissertations projects in progress.  In selecting the winner of ONE of the TWO awards, the awards committee will give strong preference to studies that relate French history to that of another European country or part of the world.  The awards are administered by the Society for French Historical Studies and announced at the Society's annual meeting.

2013

Alexander Bevilacqua, Princeton University, for research on
“Islamic Culture in the European Enlightenment”
Christina Carroll, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, for research on
“Memory, Politics, and National Identity: Defining the French Empire, 1860-1914”

2012

Stephanie McBride-Schreiner, Graduate Student, Arizona State University, for the project “Medicalizing Childhood: The Convergence of Medicine, Public Health, and Child Welfare in Nineteenth-Century France and Great Britain”

Julia M. Gossard, Graduate Student, University of Texas, Austin, for the project “Reforming Children: Charity, Childhood, Commerce, and Education in Early Modern France”

2011

Elena Napolitano, doctoral candidate, University of Toronto, for “Come una Cittadella: Urban Strategy and the Vision of French Nationhood in Rome, 1660-1700”

Jessie Hewitt, doctoral candidate, University of California at Davis, for “Domesticating Madness: Psychiatric Authority and Familial Order in Nineteenth-Century France”

2010

Katie Jarvis, Graduate student, University of Wisconsin, Madison, for "Political Poissardes: The Popular Activism
and Cultural Representation of the Dames des Halles, 1789-1799."

2009

Micah Alpaugh, graduate student, University of California, Irvine, for "The Emergence of the Parisian Political Demonstration: Developing Nonviolent Protest in the French Revolution, 1787-1795"

Honorable mention to Venus Bivar, graduate student, University of Chicago, for "The Ground Beneath Their Feet: Agricultural Industrialization and the Politics of Remapping Rural France, 1954-1973"

2008

Joy Crosby, PhD candidate at the University of California, Berkeley, for "Theological Space and Making Belief: The King, the Church and the Theater in Seventeenth-Century France."

2007

Thomas Dodman, Ph.D. candidate at the University of Chicago, for “Nostalgia as Alienation in Post-Revolutionary France.”

2006

Brigitte Jelen, Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, Irvine for "Culturally Different: Immigrant In/Visibility in Post-Colonial France."

2005

Katrin Sjursen, Ph.D candidate at the University of California, Santa Barbara for "'The Heart of a Man and a Lion': Northern French Noblewomen as Medieval Military Commanders."

2004

William Max Nelson, Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, Los Angeles, for "The Weapon of Time: Constructing the Future in France, 1750 to Year I."

2003

Charly Coleman, Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University, for "Dispossession and Subjectivity: The Self in Enlightenment and Illuminism in Eighteenth-Century France."

2002

Nicole Rudolph, Ph.D candidate at Institute for French Studies, NYU, for "At Home in Postwar France. The Design and Construction of Domestic Space, 1945-1975."

THE NATALIE ZEMON DAVIS GRADUATE STUDENT PAPER AWARD

Awarded for outstanding paper presented by a graduate student at the SFHS annual meeting.

2009

Alexia Yates, University of Chicago, for "The Business of Housing: Real Estate in Turn-of-the Century Paris."

2010

Marie-Eve Chagnon, Concordia University, “L’internationalisme scientifique face à la Grande Guerre : la rupture des relations de la science française et allemande (1914-1919)"

2011

James Naus, Saint Louis University, for "Dynastic Legitimization in
Twelfth-Century France"

2012

Carolyn Purnell, University of Chicago, for "Instrumental Feeling: The Stable Characteristics of Sensibility, 1740-1789"

2013
Angela Haas, Suny Binghamton, for "Dubious Relics, Unknown Saints,
and the Evolution of Lay Piety in Eighteenth-Century France"